CHRISTADELPHIAN ECCLESIAL GUIDE PDF

He hath, out of His own underived energy, created heaven and earth, and all that in them is. That Jesus of Nazareth was the Son of God, begotten of the Virgin Mary by the Holy Spirit, without the intervention of man, and afterwards anointed with the same Spirit, without measure, at His baptism. That the appearance of Jesus of Nazareth on the earth was necessitated by the position and state into which the human race had been brought by the circumstances connected with the first man. That the first man was Adam, whom God created out of the dust of the ground as a living soul, or natural body of life, "very good" in kind and condition, and placed him under a law through which the continuance of life was contingent on obedience. That Adam broke this law, and was adjudged unworthy of immortality, and sentenced to return to the ground from whence he was taken--a sentence which defiled and became a physical law of his being, and was transmitted to all his posterity. That God, in His kindness, conceived a plan of restoration which, without setting aside His just and necessary law of sin and death, should ultimately rescue the race from destruction, and people the earth with sinless immortals.

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He hath, out of His own underived energy, created heaven and earth, and all that in them is. That Jesus of Nazareth was the Son of God, begotten of the Virgin Mary by the Holy Spirit, without the intervention of man, and afterwards anointed with the same Spirit, without measure, at His baptism. That the appearance of Jesus of Nazareth on the earth was necessitated by the position and state into which the human race had been brought by the circumstances connected with the first man.

That the first man was Adam, whom God created out of the dust of the ground as a living soul, or natural body of life, "very good" in kind and condition, and placed him under a law through which the continuance of life was contingent on obedience.

That Adam broke this law, and was adjudged unworthy of immortality, and sentenced to return to the ground from whence he was taken--a sentence which defiled and became a physical law of his being, and was transmitted to all his posterity. That God, in His kindness, conceived a plan of restoration which, without setting aside His just and necessary law of sin and death, should ultimately rescue the race from destruction, and people the earth with sinless immortals.

That He inaugurated this plan by making promises to Adam, Abraham and David, which were afterwards elaborated in greater detail through the prophets. That these promises had reference to Jesus Christ, who was to be raised up in the condemned line of Abraham and David, and who, though wearing their condemned nature, was to obtain a title to resurrection by perfect obedience, and, by dying, abrogate the law of condemnation for himself, and all who should believe and obey him.

That it was this mission that necessitated the miraculous begettal of Christ of a human mother, enabling him to bear our condemnation, and, at the same time, to be a sinless bearer thereof, and, therefore, one who could rise after suffering the death required by the righteousness of God. That the message he delivered from God to his kinsmen, the Jews, was a call to repentance from every evil work, the assertion of his divine sonship and Jewish kingship; and the proclamation of the glad tidings that God would restore their kingdom through him, and accomplish all things written in the prophets.

That for delivering this message, he was put to death by the Jews and Romans who were, however, but instruments in the hands of God, for the doing of that which He had determined before to be done, viz. Therefore, by a figure, his blood cleanseth from sin. That on the third day, God raised him from the dead, and exalted him to the heavens as priestly mediator between God and man, in the process of gathering from among them a people who should be saved by the belief and obedience of the Truth.

That he is a priest over his own house only, and does not intercede for the world, or for professors who are abandoned to disobedience. That he makes intercession for his erring brethren, if they confess and forsake their sins. That he sent forth apostles to proclaim salvation through him, as the only Name given under heaven whereby men may be saved.

That the way to obtain this salvation is to believe the gospel they preached, and to take on the name and service of Christ, by being thereupon immersed in water, and continuing patiently in the observance of all things he has commanded, none being recognized as his friends except those who do what he has commanded.

That the gospel consists of "the things concerning the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ. That the things of the kingdom of God are the facts testified concerning the kingdom of God in the writings of the prophets and apostles, and definable as in the next 12 paragraphs.

That God will set up a kingdom in the earth, which will overthrow all others, and change them into "the kingdoms of our Lord and His Christ. That for this purpose God will send Jesus Christ personally to the earth at the close of the times of the Gentiles.

That the kingdom which he will establish will be the kingdom of Israel restored, in the territory it formerly occupied, viz. That the governing body of the Kingdom so established will be the brethren of Christ, of all generations, developed by resurrection and change, and constituting, with Christ as their head, the collective "seed of Abraham," in whom all nations will be blessed, and comprising "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets," and all in their age of like faithfulness.

That a law will be established, which shall go forth to the nations for their "instruction in righteousness," resulting in the abolition of war to the ends of the earth; and the "filling of the earth with the knowledge of the glory of Jehovah [Yahweh], as the waters cover the sea.

That at the appearing of Christ prior to the establishment of the Kingdom, the responsible faithful and unfaithful , dead and living of both classes, will be summoned before his judgment-seat "to be judged according to their works;" "and receive in body according to what they have done, whether it be good or bad. That the mission of the Kingdom will be to subdue all enemies, and finally death itself, by opening up the way of life to the nations, which they will enter by faith, during the thousand years, and in reality at their close.

That at the close of the thousand years, there will be a general resurrection and judgment, resulting in the final extinction of the wicked, and the immortalization of those who shall have established their title under the grace of God to eternal life during the thousand years.

That the government will then be delivered up by Jesus to the Father, who will manifest Himself as the "All-in-all"; sin and death having been taken out of the way, and the race completely restored to the friendship of the Deity.

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Christadelphians

Mautilar First, there must be a recognition that the best of us fail. The ecclesia also must set its face firmly against the prevailing irresponsibility in mating and parenthood. Obviously, there must be a genuine desire to put away the manner of life which has caused the separation. Christadekphian topic is locked. Javascript Disabled Detected You currently have ecclesizl disabled.

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Ecclesial Guide - CBM Edition

Posted 27 December - AM The beginning of an Ecclesia If more than one obey the truth together, the weekly breaking of bread will be an enjoyable exercise, and the nucleus of an ecclesia will have been formed. A first necessity in such a case will be a room to meet in. At first it is wise for a small group in a new area to be attached to the membership of the nearest established ecclesia, until the numbers make it practicable to become a separate ecclesia.

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