FLETTNER ROTOR SHIP PDF

Many ingenious inventions appeared; but many were either given no chance at all, or else, after a promising start, lost favour and disappeared. The ship which could carry cargo with the greatest economy was the one which got business. Germany, particularly hard hit by the surrender of her Merchant Service, had the greatest need for economical ships and probably possessed the most ingenious inventors to supply them. Time and again in the history of shipping the disast- rous effects of a slump had been overcome only by drastic technical improvement, such as the replacement of the paddle by the screw, the introduction of the surface condenser, the compound engine, the tripleexpansion engine, and other economizers.

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Whirring away, two rotor sails provide auxiliary forward thrust to a cargo ship. Now, the physics behind such curving kicks is set to be used to propel ocean ships more efficiently. Early next year, a tanker vessel owned by Maersk, the Danish transportation conglomerate, and a passenger ship owned by Viking Line will be outfitted with spinning cylinders on their decks. Rotor sails rely on a bit of aerodynamics known as the Magnus effect. In the s, German physicist Heinrich Gustav Magnus noticed that when moving through air a spinning object such as a ball experiences a sideways force.

The force comes about as follows. If the ball were not spinning, air would stream straight past it, creating a swirling wake that would stretch out directly behind the ball like the tail of a comet. The turning surface of a spinning ball, however, drags some air with it.

Thus, the spinning ball gets a sideways shove. In the early 20th century, scientists proposed using the Magnus effect to propel ships. German engineer Anton Flettner replaced square meters of sail cloth on the schooner Buckau with two meter-tall steel rotor sails, which were set spinning using a small engine.

In , the Buckau crossed the Atlantic Ocean. However, Flettner failed to find investors interested in rotor sail—powered ships. Fuel prices were simply too low and there were no environmental regulations limiting ship emissions. But the economic breeze may be freshening for sail power. All that commerce comes at an environmental price: Most vessels burn heavy fuel oil, producing heat-trapping carbon dioxide as well as soot and sulfur compounds that contribute to acid rain.

Norsepower rotor The surface of the rotating cylinder drags air with it, which deflects the air pas -.

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Flettner rotor

MONOROTOR SYSTEM Recent decades have brought a host of green ship technologies such as less resistant hull shapes and coatings, more efficient engines and propellers, waste heat recovery and many others, altogether resulting in substantial fuel savings and carbon emission mitigation. However, mainly aimed at new builds, most of the innovations cannot be implemented cost effectively to existing vessels. So, for the majority of the about 40, merchant ships around today, slow steaming remains the main route towards meaningful fuel savings. In any case, when all is said and done a vessel relying only on its engine for propulsion still needs to burn substantial amounts of fossil fuel to move cargo on the high seas.

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Flettner-Rotor

Whirring away, two rotor sails provide auxiliary forward thrust to a cargo ship. Now, the physics behind such curving kicks is set to be used to propel ocean ships more efficiently. Early next year, a tanker vessel owned by Maersk, the Danish transportation conglomerate, and a passenger ship owned by Viking Line will be outfitted with spinning cylinders on their decks. Rotor sails rely on a bit of aerodynamics known as the Magnus effect. In the s, German physicist Heinrich Gustav Magnus noticed that when moving through air a spinning object such as a ball experiences a sideways force. The force comes about as follows. If the ball were not spinning, air would stream straight past it, creating a swirling wake that would stretch out directly behind the ball like the tail of a comet.

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