A TEXTBOOK OF ENGLISH PHONETICS FOR INDIAN STUDENTS PDF

Phonetics is a branch of linguistics that deals with the study of human speech sounds. As English is the second language of Indian students, it becomes important to learn the nuances of the speech sounds of this language. This book has been written for the benefit of Indian students. This textbook presents a detailed description of English phonetics along with a comprehensive knowledge of general phonetics. Written by a talented phonetician, T Balasubramanian, this book talks about various topics related specifically to English phonetics in India.

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See Article History Phonetics, the study of speech sounds and their physiological production and acoustic qualities. It deals with the configurations of the vocal tract used to produce speech sounds articulatory phonetics , the acoustic properties of speech sounds acoustic phonetics , and the manner of combining sounds so as to make syllables, words, and sentences linguistic phonetics.

Articulatory phonetics The traditional method of describing speech sounds is in terms of the movements of the vocal organs that produce them. The main structures that are important in the production of speech are the lungs and the respiratory system , together with the vocal organs shown in Figure 1. The airstream from the lungs passes between the vocal cords , which are two small muscular folds located in the larynx at the top of the windpipe.

The space between the vocal cords is known as the glottis. If the vocal cords are apart, as they are normally when breathing out, the air from the lungs will have a relatively free passage into the pharynx see Figure 1 and the mouth. But if the vocal cords are adjusted so that there is a narrow passage between them, the airstream will cause them to be sucked together. As soon as they are together there will be no flow of air, and the pressure below them will be built up until they are blown apart again.

The flow of air between them will then cause them to be sucked together again, and the vibratory cycle will continue. Sounds produced when the vocal cords are vibrating are said to be voiced , as opposed to those in which the vocal cords are apart, which are said to be voiceless.

The air passages above the vocal cords are known collectively as the vocal tract. For phonetic purposes they may be divided into the oral tract within the mouth and the pharynx, and the nasal tract within the nose.

Many speech sounds are characterized by movements of the lower articulators—i. The upper surface includes several important structures from the point of view of speech production, such as the upper lip and the upper teeth; Figure 1 illustrates most of the terms that are commonly used. The alveolar ridge is a small protuberance just behind the upper front teeth that can easily be felt with the tongue.

The major part of the roof of the mouth is formed by the hard palate in the front, and the soft palate or velum at the back. The soft palate is a muscular flap that can be raised so as to shut off the nasal tract and prevent air from going out through the nose.

When it is raised so that the soft palate is pressed against the back wall of the pharynx there is said to be a velic closure. At the lower end of the soft palate is a small hanging appendage known as the uvula.

As may be seen from Figure 1, there are also specific names for different parts of the tongue. The tip and blade are the most mobile parts. Behind the blade is the so-called front of the tongue; it is actually the forward part of the body of the tongue and lies underneath the hard palate when the tongue is at rest. The remainder of the body of the tongue may be divided into the centre, which is partly beneath the hard palate and partly beneath the soft palate; the back, which is beneath the soft palate; and the root, which is opposite the back wall of the pharynx.

Get exclusive access to content from our First Edition with your subscription. Subscribe today The major division in speech sounds is that between vowels and consonants. Phoneticians have found it difficult to give a precise definition of the articulatory distinction between these two classes of sounds. Most authorities would agree that a vowel is a sound that is produced without any major constrictions in the vocal tract, so that there is a relatively free passage for the air.

It is also syllabic. This description is unsatisfactory in that no adequate definition of the notion syllabic has yet been formulated. Consonants In the formation of consonants, the airstream through the vocal tract is obstructed in some way. Consonants can be classified according to the place and manner of this obstruction. Some of the possible places of articulation are indicated by the arrows going from one of the lower articulators to one of the upper articulators in Figure 1.

The principal terms that are required in the description of English articulation, and the structures of the vocal tract that they involve are: bilabial, the two lips; dental, tongue tip or blade and the upper front teeth; alveolar, tongue tip or blade and the teeth ridge; retroflex, tongue tip and the back part of the teeth ridge; palato-alveolar, tongue blade and the back part of the teeth ridge; palatal, front of tongue and hard palate; and velar, back of tongue and soft palate.

The additional places of articulation shown in Figure 1 are required in the description of other languages. Note that the terms for the various places of articulation denote both the portion of the lower articulators i.

Thus velar denotes a sound in which the back of the tongue and the soft palate are involved, and retroflex implies a sound involving the tip of the tongue and the back part of the alveolar ridge. If it is necessary to distinguish between sounds made with the tip of the tongue and those made with the blade, the terms apical tip and laminal blade may be used.

There are six basic manners of articulation that can be used at these places of articulation: stop , fricative, approximant, trill, tap, and lateral.

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A Textbook of English phonetics for Indian students

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