THE ROMANOVS THE FINAL CHAPTER PDF

Main The Romanovs : the final chapter The Romanovs : the final chapter Massie , Robert K In July , nine skeletons were exhumed from a shallow mass grave near Ekaterinburg, Siberia, a few miles from the infamous cellar room where the last tsar and his family had been murdered seventy-three years before. Pulitzer Prize winner Robert K. Massie presents a colorful panorama of contemporary characters, illuminating the major scientific dispute between Russian experts and a team of Americans, whose findings, along with those of DNA scientists from Russia, America, and Great Britain, all contributed to solving one of the great mysteries of the twentieth century. Read more

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Shelves: nonfiction , history-archeology , russia At midnight, Yakov Yurovsky, the leader of the executioners, came up the stairs to awaken the family. Thus begins Robert K. Massies very interesting and well researched account of the infamous murders of the Romanov family, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra as well as their son and four daughters in the cellar of a house in Ekaterinburg, Russia in the early hours of the 17th July, Using the simplest of ploys Yurovsky had coaxed them from their bedrooms to the cellar from which there was no escape.

He then proceeded to line them up, assuring them that it was for a family photograph, and once nicely lined up they were massacred. Eleven people were killed. For as long as they thought that they could get away with it the Russian authorities denied that the royal family had been killed. Eventually they admitted that Tsar Nicholas was dead, but they would not say anything about the rest of the family.

This is not a book about what came before, or why the Romanovs were in the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg in the first place. It is assumed that the reader knows the history at least partially up to this point. The book focuses on the subsequent questions and problems and how these were resolved or not. Eight days after the gruesome event the Whites took Ekaterinburg and arrived at the Ipatiev House.

Mr Massie describes what they found. Bodies cannot be burned to ash over an open fire, and besides, teeth are indestructible. Then in May the burial site was found by Alexander Avdonin and filmmaker Geli Ryabov, who also procured a document written by the chief assasin, Yakov Yurovsky.

The finding of the site was not accidental, and the author describes how they went about locating it. However fear kept them from announcing their find until several years later. Once Boris Yeltsin came to power permission was sought and granted to excavate the burial site where nine instead of eleven skeletons were found. The finding of these skeletons caused more questions than answers.

Were they the murdered Romanovs? Who was missing, and why? The empress was found to be wearing a belt of pearls made up of several necklaces sewed into linen. DNA tests were not an option for the Russians at the time, and forensic anthropologist Sergei Abramov developed methods to ascertain whether or not the bones belonged to the Romanovs whilst a mathematician calculated probabilities.

Before long an American forensic anthropologist, William Maples became involved. Whilst everyone was in agreement that the skeleton of the young tsarevich Alexis was missing, Abramov felt certain that the other missing skeleton belonged to Marie whereas Maples believed that it belonged to the youngest daughter, Anastasia. This was not the only time that scientists would disagree about their findings. He obtained a blood sample from Prince Philip himself, which helped Dr Gill prove the identity of Alexandra and her daughters.

Mr Massie provides a run-down of the basics of DNA profiling. All the goings on had not only captured the interest of the public, but also of a whole variety of imposters. There are hilarious accounts of some of the fabricated stories. One man who received a death sentence for theft suddenly remembered that he was the tsarevich Alexis. Another was a successful spy, who once he became a United States citizen proclaimed that he was the tsarevich. A big problem for those pretending to be Alexis: Alexis had suffered from haemophilia.

Then there were the women, the most notorious of whom was Anna Anderson who declared herself to be the Grand Duchess Anastasia. There was even a play and a film. Anna Anderson certainly captured the imagination of many. Was she who she claimed to be or not? Litigation ensued. Finally a verdict was announced. Then came the conspiracy theories… There were other scientists involved in the saga, and there had also been a conference in Ekaterinburg in which various papers were delivered and discussed.

There is a discussion of who is left of the other branches of the Romanov family, and what their views and their pretensions to a non-existent throne are.

Mr Massie closes with a chapter in which he details how the Romanov family spent the seventy-eight days that they lived at the Ipatiev House prior to being summoned to the cellar. There is a layout of the house, and at the back of the book there are photos of several of the people mentioned in the book. The Ipatiev House was destroyed in

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Shelves: nonfiction , history-archeology , russia At midnight, Yakov Yurovsky, the leader of the executioners, came up the stairs to awaken the family. Thus begins Robert K. Massies very interesting and well researched account of the infamous murders of the Romanov family, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra as well as their son and four daughters in the cellar of a house in Ekaterinburg, Russia in the early hours of the 17th July, Using the simplest of ploys Yurovsky had coaxed them from their bedrooms to the cellar from which there was no escape. He then proceeded to line them up, assuring them that it was for a family photograph, and once nicely lined up they were massacred. Eleven people were killed. For as long as they thought that they could get away with it the Russian authorities denied that the royal family had been killed.

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[PDF] The Romanovs: The Final Chapter Book by Robert K. Massie Free Download (320 pages)

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